Category Archives: finance

Money and Power

If anyone wants to know why money was invented they need to look at the power that it generates. Politically it is the mainstay of governments while religiously it has grown gods and made their organisations indispensable. So where does it fit into the scheme of human behaviour and why is it at the root of the World Order? One could may assume that something other than an invented commodity would fit that role so why doesn’t it?

When humans took to a sedentary life and gave up wandering the forests and taking their food from the land, as God originally intended, they had time to think about other things. In the depositions of their living areas archaeologist have uncovered tales of their development from what might be termed primitive living to the more sophisticated trade deals and exchange of goods.

Other things crop up as well and chief among them is the religious side of life and the sacred sites where they imprinted their feelings and beliefs on items in art form. Over time the images became ever more lifelike and their meanings clearer. It was there where my research discovered the power.

It came first in the form of an exchange between humanity and the Sun-God. This unmistakable giving of life for prosperity permeates the ancient world and mysterious sites, like Stonehenge in England, or the temples of the Maya in Mexico. They stand as fortresses of power holding a code within that is only now interpretable.

My reincarnation and evidence that there is no heaven or hell is behind my ability to look at these sites from a different perspective and without the religious bias to better understand their meaning. It is a fact that the ancients were desperate to communicate with the sun and they worked out ways to do that. One way was to send a man up riding the cross as a kite to mate with the Mother God. This is shown in rock art in Nordic regions, such as Ostergotland (star of god’s land).

Dispersed light creates rings of seven colours, the same as the rainbow, and the number for ‘her’ is ‘seven’. The man is number 8 and multiplied together 7×8 is 56, the number of holes in the outer circle of Stonehenge. Both these numbers are linked to ancient beliefs that carry over into modern religious practices.

There are 7 candles on the altar of Christian churches, and 7 lights in the normal Jewish menorah, and so on. There are also 7 days of the week and 3×7 is 21, another mystical number. The 3 represents the ancient trinity of Mother God, sun and light.

Stonehenge displays the practice of exchanging god-men on crosses for fertility of the earth. The core of the site is the horse-shoe shape enclosed by the trilithons, made of 2 upright stones with a cap supporting them are the top. The ‘horse’ features prominently in ancient rituals and the white horse was etched out of the underlying chalk in several places in both Britain and Europe.

In time the use of circles as a symbol of exchange gave rise to the coins that were imprinted with the king’s head because he was supposedly the one married to the sun. The magic of handing over his image in exchange for goods took hold and gave rise to the monetary system. It was enhanced by Constantine, who established the Catholic Church in the year 325. He is also the one who organised the system of commerce that is still in play.

The circle with cross symbol is found in and around many sites on every inhabited continent and the first coins were of the same symbol. Later the king’s head was put inside the circle to suggest he is the thing that is the metaphor of the exchange. It provided extra power to the money, while that term comes from ‘moni’ or ‘man in the eye.’

The Future of Financial Services

The ease of making financial transactions and financial services in general, had first been revolutionised when telegraph companies introduced wire transfers. But with the coming of new age financial services like Bitcoin and Ripple, it is the time we address the question of what the future holds for the financial services of the world.

Traditional Wire Transfers

Let us begin by first taking a look at how things have been going on for these past 150 years since wire transfers were first introduced. Transferring funds using a wire transfer method via a bank is not a single step process but a multi-step process. It is like this:

    • The sender approaches his or her bank and orders the transfer of funds to an account. Unique codes like BIC and IBAN codes are provided to the bank by the sender so that the bank knows exactly where the funds need to be transferred.
    • The sender’s bank contacts the receiver’s bank by sending a message through a security system, such as Fedwire or SWIFT, signalling it that a transfer needs to be made. The receiver’s bank receives this message, which includes settlement instructions as well, and then asks the sender’s bank to transfer the amount specified in the message.
    • The sender’s bank now transfers the amount. This is not done in one go but bit by bit, so it can take anywhere from a few hours to a couple of days for the entire sum to be transferred.
  • To make the transfer, the two banks must have a reciprocal account with one another. If that is not the case, the transfer is made through a correspondent bank that holds such an account.

As one can see, this form of transfer relies overly on a mediator, takes more time than it should, and can prove to be costly as the banks charge some fee for their service. Distributed currencies like Bitcoin provide a viable alternative to this process.

Decentralized Currencies

What sets services like Bitcoin apart from traditional services is that they do not rely on a central mediator but rather operate using cryptographic protocols. The process is therefore faster, simpler, and much more efficient. The system is quite transparent to both end users as well while traditional systems are susceptible to fraud due to the complex process involved.

However, there is a downside to this too. With services like Bitcoin, it is simple to trace a transaction back to each unit value’s creation.

Solution? A Common Ground

More and more people are opting for services like Bitcoin and peer-to-peer mobile transfers, where a network operator could help users transfer funds by simply sending an SMS. Although these are indeed more efficient, they are a long way from global acceptance because there are many who still do not have bank accounts, plus there is the issue of limited user identification in such services.

What would be ideal for everyone is if banks could tap into the potential of decentralized currencies and overlap the source code of services like Ripple on their existing system to form a hybrid of the two. It would kill two birds with one stone as:

    1. Decentralized currency systems provide more efficient transfers
  1. Bank systems ensure only registered users access the service, taking away the possibility of foul play.


The world has come a long way since the last time an indigenous financial service system was introduced. There is definitely a crying need to improve this traditional service and decentralized currencies like Bitcoin have shown them the way.